Thursday, January 19, 2006

First they wiretap us, now they look at our search history

At what point does the Bush Administration outlaw front doors, window blinds, and curtains? I mean, if you’re not doing anything illegal, why wouldn’t you want the government looking through your window, right?


Unreal. Today comes word that the Bush Administration wants Google to turn over:

A broad range of material from its databases, including a request for 1 million random Web addresses and records of all Google searches from any one-week period.

Talk about casting a wide net.

Does this sound like a democracy? Unfettered wiretaps. Imprisonment of citizens without access to counsel. Violation of international treaties whenever it suits them. Repeatedly claiming to be above the law. Labeling of those who do not unflinchingly support you are your aiding and abetting the enemy. Requiring oaths of loyalty before letting people attend “public” events. Just unreal.


  1. I wrote about over on my own blog in a longer post about thinking about doing searches on Google. Stop by and have a read.

  2. So, what do we do until someone puts an end to the silliness? Start a campaign to conduct "dangerous" web searches to make the data even less useful. Maybe something like SETI@Home, where you can have your screensaver run searches for random combinations of suspect terms.

    Yabba dabba doo.

  3. Your rants would be more persuasive if they were grounded in fact rather than laced with hyperbole. Bush may be a bozo but "unfettered wiretaps?" Give me a break.

  4. When you have no idea how to proceed you just throw out a wide net and hope you catch something. I think the administration has no idea how to handle the "terrorist crisis" so they are just trying to grab anything and hold on.

    And yes Tony, "unfettered wiretaps" without review of a court even though a special top secret court exists for just this reason.