Monday, May 5, 2003

5/03: Radar Magazine profile of Howard Dean

I’ve seen several sites mention that the inaugural issue of Radar contains a profile on Howard Dean, but I haven’t seen any quotes of the article. In all, it’s a solid overview, with a much more personal feel than many other profiles. (The closest is probably Jake Tapper’s profile in Salon that ran in March.)

I realize what it is that distinguishes him from the other Democratic politicians and what makes his candidacy seem, especially to political insiders, so improbable. … [W]hat makes Dean seem like such an outsider is, curiously, that his passions should inform and drive his politics, and that the game of running for president should be about issues. There is something anachronistic – and refreshing – about this; it’s no coincidence, after all, that Dean often brings to mind the principled President Jed Bartlet of television’s The West Wing, and not just because both men are urbane liberals, married to doctors, or former governors of New England states.

The article concludes with fundraiser and Dean supporter Steve Grossman’s summary of the DNC Winter Meeting speech:

“The DNC meeting will be seen in time as the equivalent of Bill Clinton’s speech to the Association of State Democratic Chairs in Chicago in November ’91,” he says referring to the event that transformed Clinton from the governor of a sleepy state into a figure of national prominence. “That moment when [Dean] stepped up to the microphone in the middle of a whole group of people – he stood head and shoulders above everybody else in terms of connectivity. There was real connection. I was approached by members of the DNC who said, ‘You know, he spoke to all of the things that I have been looking for in a candidate. I so want my candidate to be someone I feel passionate about, so people don’t yawn on the other end.’ And, you know, nobody yawns when you talk about Howard Dean.”

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